Posts Tagged ‘Film’


Recently I finished the Season 5 of drama series Dexter that centres on Dexter Morgan (Michael C. Hall), a bloodstain pattern analyst for the Miami Metro Police Department who moonlights as a serial killer.

I didn’t get much interested in the initial episodes of season one because they were slow and looked real life. Ironic yes, but a drama is meant to be vibrant. But after a few initial restraints and hiccups I got the feel of the character and jumped on to the journey of watching the entire 5 seasons in one go. It took me one month to complete the series.

Why I’m writing about Dexter is because I felt connected to him on real grounds. Watching him trying to fit in the world around him and yet fulfilling his insatiable desire to kill was just so engaging. His dissociative mental illness was discovered by his adoptive father Harry Morgan who taught Dexter the ethics and procedures to make sure the “Dark Passenger” inside Dexter is tamed if not controlled. The upbringing by Harry made him the “Dark Defender”.

As much solid the Harry’s Code may have been on paper and reel, it got me thinking what would happen to Dexter if he was real? I mean, there were so many loop holes in the ways he worked. He was so distracted sometimes and even though he got away with the murders he did, in real life it would have been difficult for him to do those crimes even after following Harry’s Code.

So what would be the best place for Dexter if he’d really existed?

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Going by the real life stories of few serial killers, it looked like their modus operandi was same. Commit crime and vanish. But Dexter cannot vanish away. He had a need to fulfil. So in my opinion the best place for him to execute his operation would be India. And what could be better than being a part of Indian Police System. He would be untouchable. Even if there would be a Sergeant. James Doakes, he would be the least concern of all. Doakes would be busy with all the other stuff that no other police system can offer in the world, lest to worry about a killer. The system here works in a magical way. If you fight the system, it will ultimately pounce back on you, even though the system is there to protect you. But if you are in the system, then you are the system. You are above law.

Killing someone and get away with is more easy than breaking a traffic signal. You cannot just cross the traffic police without an attention. That is the most active area of the police department with ample expertise in nabbing the culprit. They will catch and beat the hell out of you if you cross a signal. But if you confess to them that you have committed a crime, chances are they might sense something fishy and do not arrest you. They might put an enquiry on you and harass a few people related to the victim but will make sure you get a fair trial and get out of the crime neat and clean. Where else can you find such an effective system which thinks so much about you?

So I would suggest that Dexter should take birth in India. Although finding a father like Harry would be a Herculean task given the reference that it is India we are talking about. Here his father might force him to join the street and he could become a Gunda – an equally aspiring and forceful system as a police force and they sometimes enjoy an upper hand too over the later. But I do not want him to be like that. So given the chance I would presume that he comes loaded with the knowledge of Harry’s Code. I will throw a dime or two in a wishing well if I need to. Because having Dexter in India would be great as he’d be doing good and he won’t be having problem finding his prey as there are plenty who gets away from the system. He would be a perfect setup to clean up the society and still remain off the Radar. And in dire situation if he does get caught, there’s a long journey of trials to cover up to prove anything.

All in all, the great package he could get in India is unbeatable.

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TheHangoverPartII

Directed by: Todd Phillips

Starring: Bradley Cooper
                      
Ed Helms
                      
Zach Galifianakis

It’s been two years when the wolfpack made a escapade in Las Vegas. This time the action is on the “Land of the Free” – Thailand.

Stu (Ed Helms), Phil (Bradley Cooper), Doug (Justin Bartha), and Alan (Zach Galifianakis) are traveling to Thailand to celebrate Stu’s wedding to his fiancée, Lauren (Jamie Chung). Much to Alan’s dismay, they are joined by Lauren’s younger brother, Teddy (Mason Lee).

 

Before coming to Thailand, Stu made it clear that they are not having a bachelor’s party. On reaching Thailand, Stu’s father-in-law shows his grudge against the marriage and more particularly his hatred towards Stu by raising a toast and giving a satire speech. After the party, Phil invites the Boy’s gang for a beach side booze and schmooze get together.

The next morning story takes a hideous turn when Stu, Phil and Alan woke in a cheap hotel room in Bangkok accompanied by a monkey and Chow, the gansta and missing Teddy. The Hangover start again and the wolfpack found itself on a journey to find Teddy and to figure out what happened to them the last night.

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Direction: In one word – Superb.

Acting: It’s not easy to portray a common man desperation and frustration but the trio makes it easy. Each contribute fully for their part to make the hangover really the worst they ever had. But…there is a big BUT this time. It is not funny this time. There are moments, yes but they can be easily counted on fingers. The innocence in Allan is missing. He is no more irritating the way he used to be. I couldn’t feel the connection to the occasional laughter. Stu and Phil are like before. The surprise elements of each character is also missing. But still they are out there and there is no stopping to strange events unlocked as they move on their journey to find Teddy. As always, many of their acts are raunchy which rubs your funny bone anyhow. The incidents that happened to them are cruel and raw but somehow they make us feel amused for everything bad that happens to them. This is the beauty which is still retained and that what makes the movie fun and easy going.

Final Verdict: If you want to see Hangover – this is certainly not the sequel you are looking for. But…again there is a big BUT…go for it if you want to have some good time. It is certainly not the best out there but it is good.


Academy Award popularly known as Oscar, all over the world is the most awaited award ceremony each year.

Each January, the entertainment community and film fans around the world turn their attention to the Academy Awards. Interest and anticipation builds to a fevered pitch leading up to the Oscar telecast in February, when hundreds of millions of movie lovers tune in to watch the glamorous ceremony and learn who will receive the highest honors in filmmaking. Today the 83rd Academy Awards were announced and the winner stand tall with 4 trophies in major nominations: Best Motion Picture, Best Actor in lead role, Best Director and Best Original Screenplay.

Ladies and Gentlemen, the Award goes to “The King’s Speech”.

The other top winners of the evening were Inception with 4 trophies (Achievement in Cinematography, Achievement in Sound Mixing, Achievement in Sound Editing and Achievement in Visual Effects), The Social Network with 3 trophies (Best Adapted Screenplay, Best Original Score and Achievement in Film Editing).

Two times Academy Award winner AR Rahman, who was nominated for Best Original Song and Best Original Score, lost out on both the trophies.

Here is the complete list of Nominees and Winners in each category:

Actor in a Leading Role

  • Javier Bardem in “Biutiful”
  • Jeff Bridges in “True Grit”
  • Jesse Eisenberg in “The Social Network”
  • Colin Firth in “The King’s Speech”
  • James Franco in “127 Hours”

Actor in a Supporting Role

  • Christian Bale in “The Fighter”
  • John Hawkes in “Winter’s Bone”
  • Jeremy Renner in “The Town”
  • Mark Ruffalo in “The Kids Are All Right”
  • Geoffrey Rush in “The King’s Speech”

Actress in a Leading Role

  • Annette Bening in “The Kids Are All Right”
  • Nicole Kidman in “Rabbit Hole”
  • Jennifer Lawrence in “Winter’s Bone”
  • Natalie Portman in “Black Swan”
  • Michelle Williams in “Blue Valentine”

Actress in a Supporting Role

  • Amy Adams in “The Fighter”
  • Helena Bonham Carter in “The King’s Speech”
  • Melissa Leo in “The Fighter”
  • Hailee Steinfeld in “True Grit”
  • Jacki Weaver in “Animal Kingdom”

Animated Feature Film

  • “How to Train Your Dragon” Chris Sanders and Dean DeBlois
  • “The Illusionist” Sylvain Chomet
  • “Toy Story 3” Lee Unkrich

Art Direction

  • “Alice in Wonderland”
    Production Design: Robert Stromberg; Set Decoration: Karen O’Hara
  • “Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows Part 1”
    Production Design: Stuart Craig; Set Decoration: Stephenie McMillan
  • “Inception”
    Production Design: Guy Hendrix Dyas; Set Decoration: Larry Dias and Doug Mowat
  • “The King’s Speech”
    Production Design: Eve Stewart; Set Decoration: Judy Farr
  • “True Grit”
    Production Design: Jess Gonchor; Set Decoration: Nancy Haigh

Cinematography

  • “Black Swan” Matthew Libatique
  • “Inception” Wally Pfister
  • “The King’s Speech” Danny Cohen
  • “The Social Network” Jeff Cronenweth
  • “True Grit” Roger Deakins

Costume Design

  • “Alice in Wonderland” Colleen Atwood
  • “I Am Love” Antonella Cannarozzi
  • “The King’s Speech” Jenny Beavan
  • “The Tempest” Sandy Powell
  • “True Grit” Mary Zophres

Directing

  • “Black Swan” Darren Aronofsky
  • “The Fighter” David O. Russell
  • “The King’s Speech” Tom Hooper
  • “The Social Network” David Fincher
  • “True Grit” Joel Coen and Ethan Coen

Documentary (Feature)

  • “Exit through the Gift Shop” Banksy and Jaimie D’Cruz
  • “Gasland” Josh Fox and Trish Adlesic
  • “Inside Job” Charles Ferguson and Audrey Marrs
  • “Restrepo” Tim Hetherington and Sebastian Junger
  • “Waste Land” Lucy Walker and Angus Aynsley

Documentary (Short Subject)

  • “Killing in the Name” Jed Rothstein
  • “Poster Girl” Sara Nesson and Mitchell W. Block
  • “Strangers No More” Karen Goodman and Kirk Simon
  • “Sun Come Up” Jennifer Redfearn and Tim Metzger
  • “The Warriors of Qiugang” Ruby Yang and Thomas Lennon

Film Editing

  • “Black Swan” Andrew Weisblum
  • “The Fighter” Pamela Martin
  • “The King’s Speech” Tariq Anwar
  • “127 Hours” Jon Harris
  • “The Social Network” Angus Wall and Kirk Baxter

Foreign Language Film

  • “Biutiful” Mexico
  • “Dogtooth” Greece
  • “In a Better World” Denmark
  • “Incendies” Canada
  • “Outside the Law (Hors-la-loi)” Algeria

Makeup

  • “Barney’s Version” Adrien Morot
  • “The Way Back” Edouard F. Henriques, Gregory Funk and Yolanda Toussieng
  • “The Wolfman” Rick Baker and Dave Elsey

Music (Original Score)

  • “How to Train Your Dragon” John Powell
  • “Inception” Hans Zimmer
  • “The King’s Speech” Alexandre Desplat
  • “127 Hours” A.R. Rahman
  • “The Social Network” Trent Reznor and Atticus Ross

Music (Original Song)

  • “Coming Home” from “Country Strong” Music and Lyric by Tom Douglas, Troy Verges and Hillary Lindsey
  • “I See the Light” from “Tangled” Music by Alan Menken Lyric by Glenn Slater
  • “If I Rise” from “127 Hours” Music by A.R. Rahman Lyric by Dido and Rollo Armstrong
  • “We Belong Together” from “Toy Story 3″ Music and Lyric by Randy Newman

Best Picture

  • “Black Swan” Mike Medavoy, Brian Oliver and Scott Franklin, Producers
  • “The Fighter” David Hoberman, Todd Lieberman and Mark Wahlberg, Producers
  • “Inception” Emma Thomas and Christopher Nolan, Producers
  • “The Kids Are All Right” Gary Gilbert, Jeffrey Levy-Hinte and Celine Rattray, Producers
  • “The King’s Speech” Iain Canning, Emile Sherman and Gareth Unwin, Producers
  • “127 Hours” Christian Colson, Danny Boyle and John Smithson, Producers
  • “The Social Network” Scott Rudin, Dana Brunetti, Michael De Luca and Ceán Chaffin, Producers
  • “Toy Story 3” Darla K. Anderson, Producer
  • “True Grit” Scott Rudin, Ethan Coen and Joel Coen, Producers
  • “Winter’s Bone” Anne Rosellini and Alix Madigan-Yorkin, Producers

Short Film (Animated)

  • “Day & Night” Teddy Newton
  • “The Gruffalo” Jakob Schuh and Max Lang
  • “Let’s Pollute” Geefwee Boedoe
  • “The Lost Thing” Shaun Tan and Andrew Ruhemann
  • “Madagascar, carnet de voyage (Madagascar, a Journey Diary)” Bastien Dubois

Short Film (Live Action)

  • “The Confession” Tanel Toom
  • “The Crush” Michael Creagh
  • “God of Love” Luke Matheny
  • “Na Wewe” Ivan Goldschmidt
  • “Wish 143” Ian Barnes and Samantha Waite

Sound Editing

  • “Inception” Richard King
  • “Toy Story 3” Tom Myers and Michael Silvers
  • “Tron: Legacy” Gwendolyn Yates Whittle and Addison Teague
  • “True Grit” Skip Lievsay and Craig Berkey
  • “Unstoppable” Mark P. Stoeckinger

Sound Mixing

  • “Inception” Lora Hirschberg, Gary A. Rizzo and Ed Novick
  • “The King’s Speech” Paul Hamblin, Martin Jensen and John Midgley
  • “Salt” Jeffrey J. Haboush, Greg P. Russell, Scott Millan and William Sarokin
  • “The Social Network” Ren Klyce, David Parker, Michael Semanick and Mark Weingarten
  • “True Grit” Skip Lievsay, Craig Berkey, Greg Orloff and Peter F. Kurland

Visual Effects

  • “Alice in Wonderland” Ken Ralston, David Schaub, Carey Villegas and Sean Phillips
  • “Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows Part 1” Tim Burke, John Richardson, Christian Manz and Nicolas Aithadi
  • “Hereafter” Michael Owens, Bryan Grill, Stephan Trojansky and Joe Farrell
  • “Inception” Paul Franklin, Chris Corbould, Andrew Lockley and Peter Bebb
  • “Iron Man 2” Janek Sirrs, Ben Snow, Ged Wright and Daniel Sudick

Writing (Adapted Screenplay)

  • “127 Hours” Screenplay by Danny Boyle & Simon Beaufoy
  • “The Social Network” Screenplay by Aaron Sorkin
  • “Toy Story 3” Screenplay by Michael Arndt; Story by John Lasseter, Andrew Stanton and Lee Unkrich
  • “True Grit” Written for the screen by Joel Coen & Ethan Coen
  • “Winter’s Bone” Adapted for the screen by Debra Granik & Anne Rosellini

Writing (Original Screenplay)

  • “Another Year” Written by Mike Leigh
  • “The Fighter” Screenplay by Scott Silver and Paul Tamasy & Eric Johnson;
    Story by Keith Dorrington & Paul Tamasy & Eric Johnson
  • “Inception” Written by Christopher Nolan
  • “The Kids Are All Right” Written by Lisa Cholodenko & Stuart Blumberg
  • “The King’s Speech” Screenplay by David Seidler

For complete story and information – Click Here


due-date-movie-posterDirector: Todd Phillips

Starring: Robert Downey, Jr.
Zach Galifianakis

Plot: Another road trip movie, with unusual events and unusual partners. Peter Highman (Robert Downey Jr) is heading from Atlanta to Los Angeles to witness his wife Sarah (Michelle Monaghan) give birth to their first child. When the bumbling Ethan Tremblay (Zach Galifianakis) gets both of them kicked off the plane and onto the no-fly list. The story takes a swing from here when both of them take a road trip to L.A. and what follows is a series of events which will keep your jaw at unrest.

My Take: I was sitting on a laughter coaster since the very first scene and enjoyed every bit of the movie. The sophisticated and cultures yet dark Peter and the irritating and foolish yet innocent Ethan sets the screen vibrant with their never matching on screen chemistry. Winking smile

The script is not new. Scenes are predictable and so is the story. But the beauty lies in the way the same old fish is presented in a fresh bowl with fresh garnishing. The events that can go bad tends to turn worse and both the actors flows smoothly along with the story. In this short but never seems to end trip, they keep on loosing and winning each others trust and so is their own personality traits keep on changing.  The new acquaints have multiple crazy encounters together, including being questioned by border patrol for allegedly smoking marijuana and flipping their rental car over a bridge after Ethan falls asleep at the wheel. While Peter despises Ethan at first for getting him into their crazy situation, he eventually grows to tolerate, and even somewhat like, his goof-ball but well-meaning travel companion.

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You may compare it to the ‘Planes, Trains, and Automobiles’, which I heard is where the plot has been taken from. But that doesn’t lessen the credit of this film. I liked it bit by bit. It was a laughter bonanza this season and I’d pretty much give my thumbs up for Robert and Zach for their acting.

Robert Downey Jr. as Peter Highman, an architect portrays the role of an uptight, cultured and straight laced person who lives by the rules and plays it safe. His portrayal of Peter makes you pity on him when he is helpless in the company of Ethan Tremblay played by Zach Galifianakis an aspiring and budding actor who wants to go to Hollywood and try his talent which he has none. While Ethan free spirited ways are annoying and irritating and are causing undue results we end up admiring the character for the innocence that it carries.

So I will recommend it as a must watch and ask you not to pay attention to the comparisons drawn upon the movie and instead go and see the movie yourself because in the end what matters is that you will come out laughing and rolling on the floor. This light headed movie is a must watch. Go and unburden your load. Smile


I stumbled upon this article which was showcased at my friends FB profile and couldn’t help myself from posting this on my blog. I hope you will also enjoy this as much as I did.
Like the old Chinese saying goes, “Sometimes, a beaver is just a squirrel with big teeth.” Don’t ask me which Chinese person actually said that because there are a lot of them and i can’t be bothered to provide every single detail. The event that reminded me of this popular Chinese rodent-canine maxim was a seemingly innocuous outing to the movie theatre. I saw a flick that had advertised itself as a comedy thriller but turned out to be one that belongs to a niche genre that i often refer to as ‘equestrian excreta’.

On one Tuesday that felt a lot like a Thursday, i stumbled upon the answer to one of life’s biggest philosophical conundrums. No, not the ‘Is Bruce Lee still alive?’ question but the other one which is, ‘What’s going on with the movie world?’ And the answer to that is that every movie, despite its nationality and language, is actually the same. I’m well accustomed to three movie industries: Hollywood, Bollywood and Zollywood (that’s the collective name i’ve given for south Indian movies) and i’m going to try and explain here what the differences and similarities of these three ‘woods’ are.

When it comes to the Hollywood hero, he has impeccable looks; is self-made and well-to-do but not super-rich; finds the time to come up with hilarious one-liners even in the middle of dangerous crises; is often the only man in the world who can save the world. The Bollywood hero is fair-skinned; has a rich father who doesn’t hug him enough; craves true love and has no interest in the dozens of super-hot ladies throwing themselves at him; has no problem crying uncontrollably when delivering moving dialogues; is capable of fighting off at least 8-10 villains single-handedly. The Zollywood hero is above retirement age but still in his 30s; a misunderstood thug with a heart of gold; has a secret tragic family background (revealed only to the heroine) with one bed-ridden father, one paraplegic brother, two nubile sisters and one mother who cries at the drop of a coin; can jump over buildings; can punch police officers right in the mouth and get away with it; is capable of fighting at least 45-48 villains single-handedly.

As for heroines, the Hollywood variety is drop-dead gorgeous but still can’t find a guy or a job; has totally unattractive best friends; keeps picking fights with the hero throughout the movie but realises she loves him 10 minutes before the movie ends; has impromptu make-out sessions with the hero mostly after arguments. The Bollywood heroine is drop-dead gorgeous and as kind as Mother Teresa; has an abusive fiance who makes her realise how great the hero is; is extremely innocent but does at least one steamy song where she tries to seduce the hero but he keeps walking away. And the Zollywood heroine is portrayed by an actress barely out of school; doesn’t seem to mind that her grandfather is a few years younger to the hero; is rich and posh but falls for the thug; has a demonic power-hungry father; is extremely innocent but has at least three songs where she tries to explicitly seduce the hero but he keeps walking away.

The Hollywood villain is scorned by society, turned evil for a reason but has a brilliant mind and is just as good-looking as the hero while the Bollywood villain wears a tuxedo, has terribly bad aim when it comes to shooting and has the hots for the heroine. And the Zollywood type has a thick beard, is a rival thug or a high-profile politician and is often played by an unsuccessful Bollywood actor.

The Hollywood story? The girl and the world are in danger. The Bollywood story is that the girl is in danger, and as for Zollywood, the girl and south Indian commoners are in danger.

Read more: Same old story – Edit Page – Opinion – Home – The Times of India http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/home/opinion/edit-page/Same-old-story/articleshow/6500802.cms#ixzz0yoJDFbc2


Cast: Abhishek Bachchan, Aishwarya Rai Bachchan, Vikram, Govinda, Ravi Kishen

Direction: Mani Ratnam

Music: A.R. Rahman

Raavan – The contemporary adaptation of India’s greatest epic is a failure. Why? Because the line between good and bad is too shady. At times, you will be on the side of Dev(Ram) and on the next frame change, your opinion for Raavan(Beera) will change for better reasons.

So let’s do the anatomy of this mega starrer multi lingual release from Mani Ratnam, one of the greatest director in Indian cinema.

To start with, the film took off from the abduction of  Raagini(Aishwarya), who is the better half of S.P. Dev Pratap Sharma(Vikram) by Beera(Abhishek) who is shown as a mysterious character who has his own reasons behind all this drama. From start till end, I couldn’t make out the who is the real Raavan as every one had a shady greyish character. It would be wrong to compare the character of  Beera with Raavan alone as others too shared the same box from time to time.

Abhishek Bacchan had a chance to revive his image but he bites more than he can chew. His performance was stale and boring. The depiction of several voices in his brain ranting at the same time is too overused. It irritates you to the core. His mood swings are not expressive and lacks the complexion of a mighty warrior as he is shown to be. Overall, this is the apple of sin for him, which he better had not took on the first place. The attitude of Yuva and the altitude of Guru, both were missing. He is better than what he played in this movie.

Aishwarya did nothing to gain my respect either. She is a total waste who is beautiful and delightful to watch and still hold her charishma but without the talent. She cries,scream, weeps and then again cries, scream and weeps, but I barely feel sorry for her, because she doesn’t look genuine. It seems she had a soft corner for Beera (lolz…ofcourse she has a soft corner for his husband) even before he unfold the reasons behind his deeds. But in the end, as always she looks stunning so all her sins are forgiven…lolz…

Vikram(I know him for his work in Aparichit) is a great actor with plenty of talent up his sleeves, but alas he fails to bring it all this time. His role as Dev Pratap is poorly sketched and unrefined. His threads are not stitched right it seems and are torn apart as the movie progresses. May be in the tamil version, where he plays the role of Beera he has done some justice.

Now the music of Rehman is the same as in all other movies. Listen to it, just listen. Don’t try to sing the song. The lyrics is not the USP, it’s the music. Nothing new in this department, let’s move on.

Mani sir, what is this? The person of your stature, shouldn’t be doing this. I don’t understand this usage of ropes in every stunts in every films these days. You are better than this sir. Showing the Hero running in slow motion is the least expected of you. Why such unnecessary gimmicks, overusage of rope stunts? Please upgrade yourself or stop using the old software. It’s not worth anywore.

Govinda and Ravikishen also needs a mention as they were also in the film as secondary characters. There role were as miniature as these two lines written about them. Nothing special to say, so let’s move to the good part now.

The scenery is picturesque and extremely beautifull. The cliff, the forest, the lake, the rain, the weather everything is just rightly placed where it meant to be. For a person like me, I for most of my times was more inquisitive about the background than the movie itself and the climax where Aishwarya was standing on a cliff and sees the heavenly sight of clouds and hills kissing each other like  the boundaries between the sky and earth seems to vanish  took my breath away.

The grand sets and exotic location is all that this film has to offer atleast for me. So in the end, as I close my eyes to recapture the core of the movie, I am unable to find one. This film is a lost one, nothing special about it. The epic still seems more contemporary than the adaptation itself. I will rather go watch the rerun of Ramayan rather than Raavan.


All of you who have seen the movie ‘Wednesday’… will love these rephrased Naseerudin Shah Dialogue’s…

Project Manager Rathore : कौन हो तुम..??? क्या पहचान है तुम्हारी ?

Unkonwn Caller : कौन हूँ मैं…मैं वो हूँ जो आज committment करने से डरता है, मैं वो हूँ जो आज घर जाने से डरता है, ये सोच के की कहीं घर वाले पहचानने से इंकार ना कर दे…

मैं वो हूँ जो आज job change करता है तो सोचता है की कहीं recession में मुझे कंपनी से ना निकाल दे…

मैं वो हूँ जिसकी बीवी उससे friday को दस बार फ़ोन करती है, “क्या कर रहे हो…?? काम ज्यादा है…?? थक गए हो…?? ”

मेरा हाल पूछने के लिए या काम पूछने के लिए नहीं, राठौर साब…

बल्कि वो ये जानना चाहती है की… कहीं हमेशा की तरह एंड मोमेंट पे बॉस के बुलाने पे मैं saturday को भी ऑफिस तो नहीं जा रहा…

मैं वो हूँ जो breakfast के टाइम पे डिनर करता है, लंच टाइम पे breakfast करता है, डिनर के टाइम पे लंच करता है… वो भी टाइम मिल जाए तो…

मैं वो हूँ जो अक्सर फसता  है
कभी Interviews के सवाल मे फसता है , कभी बड़ी कंपनियों के जाल में  फसता है, कभी बॉस और client के बवाल मे फसता है…

Walk-In की भीड़ तो देखी होगी आपने राठौर साब… उस भीड़ में से कोई भी चेहरा चुन लीजिए.. मैं वो हूँ…
I’m the…..STUPID SOFTWARE ENGINEER….